2019 – TOH New England – SS1000 – Conclusion

It took the amazing scores at the Tour of Honor less than 24 hours to score my submission and award me the 1st Place trophy for New England! Unexpectedly, this put me in first place for the whole tour based on sites visited. I can pretty much guarantee this is the last time I’ll ever be in the lead. I actually managed to stay there until the following Saturday which surprised me.

It took me a few days to get the paperwork together and submitted for the SS1000, it will likely be several weeks/months before I hear back from the IBA. This is my first time submitting as a premier member so I’m not sure what to expect.

Looking back at the trip, I’m pretty happy with how it went, I generally stuck to the plan and accomplished the primary and secondary goals of getting all of the New England ToH sites, and completing the SS1000. The weather was just about perfect for the time of year, sunny skys and not a drop of rain the entire time.

The bike, despite a few issues, performed very well. The brakes is a wear issue, and the aux tank mounting is entirely my fault. I’ll inspect the caliper carefully when I do the the brakes, I kind of hope they’re sticking, because otherwise I’m at a loss to explain the low MPG. I burned a total of 42 gallons, with an average MPG of 39.

I’m going to have to redesign the aux tank mount, and I’m not sure if I’ll have time to do that before the MD2020 rally in May which is disappointing.

Part of the exhaust header fell off the bike during The Void Rally last year (long story), and this was the first real trip since replacing it. Not only is it now quieter, but the bike has had a tendency to backfire when rolling off the throttle since I got it, and that’s now gone. One step forward, 2 steps back I guess.

I spent some time with support trying to figure out what was going on with the charging on my phone, and ended up having to replace it. It looks like something died in it. It’s hard to say if that was related to the trip or just coincidence, but I’m going to take a close look at all of the related wiring.

I felt pretty good the entire ride, I didn’t feel anywhere near as tired as I had on my previous SS1000. I think adding the ToH stops helps breakup the trip, and focus me better. My heated gear performed well, I was a little chilly the first day, and added another sweatshirt for the second which helped. I did end up with a small burn on the back of my left hand, so I’ll need to be careful about how high I turn the gloves up.

The other comfort issue I has was that the cheek pads pressed on my cheeks more than I’d like, and I think I was clenching my jaw. Consequently by the end of the first day my jaw was so sore I could barely open my mouth enough to eat. I’m going to look into smaller cheek pads, or maybe just compressing the ones I have more.

One of the other apps I run on my phone logs my position, and records how much time I spend at each stop. I can press a button to set category at the time, or I can tweak it after the fact. It’s interesting to see that I spent an hour and half just getting fuel on this trip. While each stop wasn’t too long, they add up quickly. One of the debates I had with myself when I was deciding to add the auxiliary fuel tank was that although my range would be longer, each fuel stop would take longer. In part to pump more fuel, but also because I have to get off the bike to fill the aux tank, I don’t to just fill the main tank. I’m going to need to play with fueling strategies to figure out what works best.

My bonus stop times were higher than they’ve been for rallies in the past and that added a lot of time. I think there are a number of reasons for this, but it’s something I’ll need to work on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for following along, I hope you enjoyed reading about the trip!

One thought on “2019 – TOH New England – SS1000 – Conclusion”

  1. Dave send me pictures of your tank setup, I’ve done one on my HD and working on one for the Honda. I might come up with some ideas.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *